Mary Quaile Event on Grunwick Strike 1976-1978, 3rd December 2016 at the Working Class Movement Library

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Our final event for 2016 looked back at the Grunwick Strike of 1976-1978, one of the most important industrial disputes of the 1970s when a group of mainly Asian women  struck for union recognition at the Grunwick film processing plant in Willesden in the hot summer of 1976. At its height in 1977  the dispute brought thousands of trade unionists on to the streets around the factory. There were frequent  violent attacks by the police on the pickets. In the end  the strike was lost.

We also highlighted the current struggle by 2,700  Teaching Assistants in Durham against  a 23% pay cut in their wages, being imposed by Labour-controlled Durham County Council.

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On the day our  venue, the  Annexe at the Working Class  Movement Library,  was full.  On behalf of the Mary Quaile Club Bernadette Hyland welcomed  the audience,  and explained  that the Club was set up to promote working class history and the links with today’s struggles.

We then screened The Great Grunwick Strike, a film made by Chris Thomas  in 2007 for Brent Trades Council which  combines contemporary  footage and photographs with interviews 30 years later with some of the key figures in the strike and supporting organisations.

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After this Annette Wright from Manchester Trades Union  Council chaired a session with our two guest speakers. Sujata Aurora from the Grunwick 40 Committee, and Lisa Turnbull from the Durham Teaching Assistants campaign.

Sujata talked about some of the issues not covered in the film, including the fact that prior to Grunwick, migrant workers had staged a number of disputes,  eg Imperial Typewriters of 1974,   which had not been supported  by the wider labour movment, indeed had been opposed.  She also noted that some  of current  celebrations of  the strike by unions had glossed over the fact that the strike had been lost.

Lisa, in an inspirational speech, spoke  about how devastated they had been by the threatened massive cut to their  wages,  and how  their campaign had been built from scratch by themselves  using social media, meetings,  marching in the Durham Miners’ Gala, and much else. They had gone on strike for 2 days:  another strike had just been called off after the local authority appeared to be offering to talk about the issue. They were determined to fight on for victory.

Ian Allinson from Ugrunwick-ian-allisonNITE at Fijutsu in Manchester  spoke from the audience about their dispute : they were going on strike again on Monday.

We then enjoyed tea and cakes, over which  much informal discussion took place. We took  a collection for  the Durham dispute which raised over £100

This event was organised in conjunction with Manchester and Salford NUJ, and Manchester Trades Union  Council, whom we would like to thank for their support.

 

More information

The Grunwick 40 Committee are holding an exhibition in Brent and organising events to mark the 40th anniversary of the strike. Their Twitter account is here

The County Durham Teaching Assistants “Value Us campaign. Their  official Twitter account is here

Unite at Fujitsu. Their Twitter acount is here

The Working Class Movement  Library has material on the Grunwick strike including photographs and books.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted in Mary Quaile club meeting, Migrant workers, trade unions, women's history, working class history

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